Your Cart

Your cart is currently empty

Burns’ Night

25 januari

De nationale dichter van Schotland , Robert Burns (geboren 25 januari 1759, Alloway, Ayrshire, Schotland – overleden 21 juli 1796, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire) wordt over de hele wereld erkend voor zijn werk dat zich richt op universele thema’s liefde en natuur. 

Hij was ook beroemd om zijn rebellie tegen orthodoxe religie en moraliteit. 

Burns schreef in drie talen: Schots, Engels en het Schots-Engelse dialect waarmee hij tegenwoordig het meest bekend is. … 

Gedichten van Burns inspireerden ook de titels van twee klassieke romans: John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men en J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye.

Ieder jaar op 25 januari is er een nationale feestdag in Schotland om hem te eren. Tevens wordt hij wereldwijd door de Schotten herdacht.

Vooral in de avond wordt zijn geboortedag gevierd als “Burns Night”

Er wordt dan een Burns Supper geserveerd met traditionele gerechten van haggis en whisky en recitals van zijn meest geliefde werk.

Deelnemers kleden zich in tartans, luisteren naar doedelzakken , zingen Auld Lang Syne – ook gezongen op oudejaarsavond – en de liederen en gedichten van de grote schrijver worden voorgedragen, met als hoogtepunt het gedicht: Address to the Haggis . ( Een ode aan de haggis)

De avond wordt geopend met:

“Some hae meat and cannot eat.

Some cannot eat that want it:

But we hae meat and we can eat,

Sae let the Lord be thankit.”

Het  Burns Supper bestaat uit:

-Cock-a-Leekiesoep of een traditioneel visgerecht.

 Een Schotse klassieker, deze verwarmende Schotse kippensoep met prei is een heerlijke start van het Burns Night-diner. …

-Haggis.  

 Dit traditionele Schotse gerecht is de ster van het Supper. …een hartig vleesgerecht in schapenblaas gekookt, waarbij vlees wordt gecombineerd met havermout, uien, zout en specerijen. 

-Neeps en Tatties.

 Gepureerde koolraap en gepureerde aardappelen.

-Aangeschoten Laird. 

 Aangeschoten Laird ( het Schotse synoniem voor Lord)  is in wezen hetzelfde als een klassieke Engelse Trifle, de pudding die al eeuwenlang Britse tafels siert, maar deze Schotse bevat Schotse frambozen en whisky, geen sherry.

-Schotse zandkoekjes of Schotse kaas

De ode aan de haggis wordt uitgebreid voorgedragen:

ADDRESS TAE THE HAGGIS

Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face,
Great Chieftain o’ the Puddin-race!
Aboon them a’ ye tak your place,
Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye wordy of a grace
As lang ‘s my arm.

The groaning trencher there ye fill,
Your hurdies like a distant hill,
Your pin wad help to mend a mill
In time o’ need,
While thro’ your pores the dews distil
Like amber bead.

His knife see Rustic-labour dight,
An’ cut ye up wi’ ready slight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
Like onie ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
Warm-reekin, rich!

Then, horn for horn, they stretch an’ strive:
Deil tak the hindmost, on they drive,
Till a’ their weel-swall’d kytes belyve
Are bent like drums;
Then auld Guidman, maist like to rive,
Bethankit hums.

Is there that owre his French ragout,
Or olio that wad staw a sow,
Or fricassee wad mak her spew
Wi’ perfect sconner,
Looks down wi’ sneering, scornfu’ view
On sic a dinner?

Poor devil! see him owre his trash,
As feckless as a wither’d rash,
His spindle shank a guid whip-lash,
His nieve a nit;
Thro’ bluidy flood or field to dash,
O how unfit!

But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
The trembling earth resounds his tread,
Clap in his walie nieve a blade,
He’ll make it whissle;
An’ legs, an’ arms, an’ heads will sned,
Like taps o’ thrissle.

Ye Pow’rs wha mak mankind your care,
And dish them out their bill o’ fare,
Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
That jaups in luggies;
But, if ye wish her gratefu’ prayer,
Gie her a Haggis!

Address to a Haggis ( Engels)

Good luck to you and your honest, plump face,
Great chieftain of the sausage race!
Above them all you take your place,
Stomach, tripe, or intestines:
Well are you worthy of a grace
As long as my arm.

The groaning trencher there you fill,
Your buttocks like a distant hill,
Your pin would help to mend a mill
In time of need,
While through your pores the dews distill
Like amber bead.

His knife see rustic Labour wipe,
And cut you up with ready slight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
Like any ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
Warm steaming, rich!

Then spoon for spoon, the stretch and strive:
Devil take the hindmost, on they drive,
Till all their well swollen bellies by-and-by
Are bent like drums;
Then old head of the table, most like to burst,
‘The grace!’ hums.

Is there that over his French ragout,
Or olio that would sicken a sow,
Or fricassee would make her vomit
With perfect disgust,
Looks down with sneering, scornful view
On such a dinner?

Poor devil! see him over his trash,
As feeble as a withered rush,
His thin legs a good whip-lash,
His fist a nut;
Through bloody flood or field to dash,
O how unfit.

But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
The trembling earth resounds his tread,
Clap in his ample fist a blade,
He’ll make it whistle;
And legs, and arms, and heads will cut off
Like the heads of thistles.

You powers, who make mankind your care,
And dish them out their bill of fare,
Old Scotland wants no watery stuff,
That splashes in small wooden dishes;
But if you wish her grateful prayer,
Give her [Scotland] a Haggis



Leave Comment

For security, use of Google's reCAPTCHA service is required which is subject to the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

I agree to these terms.